Future Future

Some people say the future is not what it used to be. The illusion of progress has faded, and our modern institutions are trying to grapple with a complex global reality. This reality is underpinned by unstable economic conditions, developing technologies and contested national identities, which countries and their inhabitants have to come to terms with. For many people these processes often take place on an abstract and large scale, but what about our immediate surroundings? The local is not necessarily smaller than the global, and arguably even more complex.

So if the future is not what it used to be, then how does the future look like if we start from where we are? We can grasp the here and now by observing the present, and from there we are able to re-imagine the past and create the future. The goal of the workshop therefore is to craft local imaginary futures, each including dimensions of an imaginary past and present. The aim of the workshop is not to predict what lies ahead or to reminisce about the past but to open up all sorts of scenario's that can be explored, so that a deterministic view of the future is questioned fundamentally.

For whom?

Preferably a mixed group of local citizens, civil servants, policy makers, journalists, artists, (interaction) designers and students from the creative fields.

Methodology

The methodology of the workshop uses Marcel Duchamps’ artistic concept of the “readymade” and Letterist International’s strategy of “détournement” to stimulate thinking about alternative futures starting from existing elements. The workshop follows three phases: Research, Speculation and Presentation.

Output

The result of the workshop will consist of a spatial installation where collected images, words and objects are staged within the created local imaginary futures for a larger public to be discussed.

Designers

Paolo Patelli Giuditta Vendrame

Booking

Interested? Get in touch with us here

Sharing

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Previous Workshops

– Kastrignàna, Castrignano de’ Greci (I), July 2014